Thursday, October 13, 2011

Sanitary conditions at MOH- clinics

On Monday I had to take my kids for their residency medicals. We went to the one in Fahaheel and where do I start? I guess we went there during the time when the maids get theirs done. First of all it's so crowded you can hardly breathe. There are seperate areas for men and women. I lined up with my kids in the womens section. As I watched the nurses take blood I was again shocked to see they never change their gloves. YUCK! One after another giving blood and still the same gloves.

When it was our turn I asked the nurse to change her gloves as she had a brand new box of gloves next to her. She snatched off her gloves and was yapping in her language to the other nurse, obvisouly complaining. Do they not understand how nasty that is and that they are in contact with bodily fluids from people from third world countries who might have some disease?

At least in America we are vaccinated against common diseases but how effective are the vaccinations against uncommon ones? As we moved on to the x-ray we entered a room with 40 maids all wearing orange gowns. Is this what prison looks lik? I must say the ministry did provide clean gowns the last couple of times I've been there but do they change each time to cleans ones, who knows? I refused to have my kids undress and put on those gowns which pissed off the maid barking out directions.

Once we reached the x-ray room the women who I assume to be Kuwaiti were nice and once she saw me whip out my alcohol swabs to clean the machine she cleaned it herself. Gross! They don't swab down the machines either unless you request it. That's the problem in Kuwait, there is no department that makes sure everyone follows rules. It is the Ministry of Health but of course citizens don' have to go through those medicals so they don't care.

I really would like to work for baladiya, I wonder if they are hiring?

If anyone has to do medicals you can request them to change gloves and clean the machines.

4 comments :

  1. learn the language
    how long have you been here
    how long will you be here
    is your husband applying for your q8i nationality, if so, learn the language, lady, minfedlick

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  2. Hi, I am a Kuwaiti med-student, an I am very upset to hear what you and your kids and other people had to go through. I can only hope that you keep believing in our health sector. I might not be able to do much for you, but I and my colleagues will try our best to keep to the routine sanitary precautions every time we're around patients, if that's any comfort at all. Again, I am terribly sorry for what you've endured.

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  3. Hey bogus, I know not all places are like that. My brother-in-law is a med student and I went to him and his collegues for some blood work and they were the best so I know it's not all places, thank you for going into med school, it's good to see Kuwaitis working in the medical sector, I wish more would become doctors and nurses for their country :)

    As for anonymous I know a few words, fe shay muaajbik? Chab zain. Why in the hell would I say minfedlick to an Indian when they speak English Duh!!!!!!!! I've been here long enough, I plan to be here even longer. Laish? Yallah 3aad....

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  4. I have been reading about the healthcare system in Kuwait and there are plans for MAJOR reforms over the next 10 years. This includes some privatization of the system which is inevitable because it is not sustainable for the government to continue to shoulder the cost for every Kuwaiti and expat. If the influx of Expatriate healthcare workers were curbed, there would be more of an incentive for Kuwaitis to enter the profession of course, with quality of healthcare would improve with privatization....I'm going to send an article about the labor system in the GCC. Even though Kuwaitis have lived it...it's very insightful.

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Comments are welcome! Personal attacks are not. Thanks!